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of these companies. the bureau can now follow whether laws are being followed from credit origination to debt collection, by identifying problems and rooting them out early we're working to try to minimize consumer harm. our report also encompasses the bureau's first enforcement actions against credit card companies that deceived consumers inch some cases the companies targeted economically vulnerable consumers with low credit scores and low credit limits. we were able to secure $425 million in relief for six million consumers and imposed penalties on the company to deter such activity in the future. these actions will senior as a warning signal for anyone who seeks to profit by misleading consumers inch the second half of 2012 we tackled issues in the market for private student loan debt which currently totals $150 billion outstanding. the studies detail the struggles students and recent graduates are experiencing. together with the education secretary we made recommendations to congress on common sense reform to ensure the risky underwriting practices of the past are not repeated. the work
evening. law-enforcement going house-to-house in the greater boston area searching for the terror suspect that is armed and possibly wired with explosives. the fbi and law enforcement searching with the 19 year-old who has managed to elude capture since this fire fight late last night. the second suspect in the monday boston marathon bombing. his brother tamerlan tsarnaev is dead and the boston area was under a lockdown and tell one hour ago urged jews stayed behind locked doors and told they were given the all clear to leave their homes. the largest shutdown in the history of any metropolitan area. here is the timeline. 10:20 p.m. last night and armed robbery reeorted at a 711 near the m.i.t. campus shortly after police received reports of shots fired on the campus. police responded to the scene and discovered in may t. campus police officer john collier shot in his car and was transported where he was pronounced dead. then the brothers hijacked a car then released him unharmed and a gas station but then less than one hour later it after it adjacent to the boston suburb during that chase
why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
to contrast that with a well known famous saying among lawyers that hard cases make bad law. in a case like this, with such extraordinary circumstances, around such an aberrant event, the best opportunities to pass meaningful legislation are not in the wake of these sort of crazy one off extraordinary events. what do you make of that? >> well, it is a real conundrum. on the one hand, holmes was right. you don't want extraordinary circumstances to create general law for average circumstances. but in another sense, this was not extraordinary. in fact, we've been living in something of a bubble. the fbi has done actually a fairly amazing job over the last decade of stopping many terrorist acts like when they occurred in other countries and europe and the middle east. and this was one that got through. but there are ways in which you could actually change laws to further enable the fbi. going back to michael isikoff's report. what if members of this mosque in boston had contacted law enforcement authorities under a new program and warned them that this fellow tsarnaev was looking a little errat
to cell phones? >> i think they didn't they would have to escape. when law enforcement figured out different pieces of this puzzle, they panicked and didn't have an alternative plan -- they were so focused on what they were doing, nothing else became important and obviously, it would have been. >> another photo of the suspect coming in right now, it shows him when he was on the wrestling team. i believe, we're going to put that up in just a second. it just came in. they got it up in the control room. we're not positive, if indeed this gray honda is occupieoccup. it could suggest as well, aps someone else was involved. >> well, maybe, george, but the idea of a stealing a car or carjacking someone else, is an act of desperation. you have seen him acting in a desperate way since basically the 7-eleven. >> yeah that's true. brad, thanks very much. >>> jon karl at the white house right now. we know we're getting more details about the president's briefing in the situation room. >> george, as you can imagine this has consumed the president, entire intelligence and national security teams
does law enforcement approach this scenario? what do you think the next few hours will look like? >> i think it will be a deliberative and careful process. as you say, they are closing in on the suspect and that is tightening. one of the concerns is does this individual have explosives attached to his body, has he taken someone hostage. is that wired explosively and we've seen that in other plots as the net tightened that the individuals decided to use explosives. >> we have boston p.d. on this, there's fbi, there's atf and massachusetts guardsmen. who is in the lead here? >> the lead will be the joint terrorism task force which is led by the fbi. so in a sense, they're organizing all of the constituent agencies and giving direction. i wonder, someone mentioned the events in the last three hour, this all was an attempted robbery. an m.i.t. rob shot and killed, grenades thrown from a vehicle. report of the dead suspect having an ied on his person. characterize, scale from one to ten, level of danger as they get closer to this remaining suspect? >> i would say it's about a level eight. b
. that got law enforcement zeroing on the two brothers. bill: mike, we're trying to piece this together as best we can but what can you tell us about the reports that the fbi is questioning him today from his hospital bed? >> reporter: all of that goes back to a "usa today" report citing anonymous sources. the sourcing is not as tight as i would like but certainly a significant development. we know he has been sedated. he has a injury to his neck or jaw, a bullet wound to his neck or jaw that prevented him from communicating. 9 report says he was roused back to consciousness and providing things in writing and providing substantive answers to questions. we know from the information he is providing that indicates there is not a larger network and not a second wave of bombings to be feared, bill. bill: mike, thank you. we'll be back with you when there are more headlines from boston. mike leading our coverage there martha. martha: we are hearing the police chatter when police first spotted dzhokhar tsarnaev hiding in that covered boat. massachusetts state police released the stunning infr
it was so hard to talk about. i've talked to doctors and law enforcement officials who have seen a lot of bad things in their day and they have a hard time talking about the carnage they saw yesterday. pamela, thank you very much. >> reporter: we're just getting word into cnn that president obama will make a statement 11:30 a.m. eastern time from the white house briefing room. not sure if it's an update on the investigation, if he has new news. but, again, that statement coming at 11:30 a.m. eastern time. we will of course bring it to you the second it happens. what happened in boston was terrifying for hundreds who were there at the scene when the bombs went off. it's terrifying to look at the video. cassidy brettler witnessed the terror firsthand. this is what she told cnn. >> i don't know. i mean, honestly, i got home last night about 11:00 and started to break down because i had been holding it in all day. i had been trying to remain composed. on social media and video just portray what was going on and tell my story. but by the time i was trying to fall asleep, it was hitting me,
. let me assure you the subcommittee is ready to help in any way we can to help law enforcement against perpetrators and planners of this act of terror and insure ensure the full force of justice is -- to think something like that taking place anything this committee do we stand ready. i want to express disappointment with regard to you and me in the subcommittee. in somecas has not takimportantm disappointed that the depant bee authities the committee to expand federal prison -- it has fallen from 23,000 in 2006 to 12,800 in fy14. this is an area where leadership is necessary and we have made it very clear that i want to support you in this effort that we need to see to take it seriously in an energetic way and we have not seen it. why can't that picture with the entire federal government and why can't the ncaa -- from prisons. you can put a man or woman in prison for 50 years and give them no work and no dignity. this will not displace american jobs but a proven way to end recidivism to make progress. i am also dissatisfied and disappointed with a noncommittal response to my suggestio
talked about the fact and law enforcement talked about the fact that they'd been through about 60% to 70% of the entire area. i'm assuming that in the hours since then, it's now, of course, 4:05 eastern time, but they made progress close to 100%. >> reporter: yeah, but what's the area? remember, the entire city is in lockdown now. they have told everybody in boston not to leave their homes, not to open their doors, except to law enforcement officers. so while they might be able to inspect the immediate area around here in watertown, it seems a herculean task to be able to do that for the entire metropolitan region that's essentially in lockdown right now. look, there's a massive police and military presence, actually, here, actually, it's right behind me, the staging area is right behind where i'm standing here at the parking lot of the watertown arsenal here. we've had early this morning convoys of military humvees, bus loads of police and state troopers coming in here and assembling for what we thought was going to be some sort of massive confrontation or assault here. we had blackhawk
. they worked with canadian intelligence and u.s. national security and law enforcement officers to interrupt this alleged plot in an 8 month investigation code named project smooth. they said the plot was detected early on and neither american nor canadian citizens faced any imminent threat as a result. u.s. officials told fox news the defendants' objective was to blow up a bridge in the tore torrent area tornted while the plane was traveling over it mounted police told reporters today that they took steps to advance the plot including allegedly conducting own surveillance of trains in the greater torrent area. tornt area. >> the individuals -- >> now i can tell that you there is no information to indicate that these attacks were state-sponsored. >> the arrest took place in montreal and toronto this afternoon. search warrants were he can executed late today. beyond the fact that neither man is a canadian citizen the nationalities were not disclosed. however, a word press account established by one of them and taken off line listed him as to your knowledge born engineer trained in industrial
process of the law and end up killing more people than the so-called bad guys. >> ambassador akbar ahmed is a professor of studies. american university for noesseni fellow with the brookings institution, a viti professor formerly served as pakistan high customer to the u.k. and the author of several books. professor come on you the member of a tribe from your country as pakistan? >> guest: >> that is an interesting question. i have a question as an anthropologist it is critical to put out there for the reader so everyone knows. my mother is a baton, my father goes back to the profit in islam and i've always found the two are very interesting in my makeup comes along the one hand there is the person who would want peace and create good will and bring people together and compassion more thoughtful and even more mystical. and sometimes these are conflict and i see this in me. so i found that when i was doing the study i was able to get under the skin of the tribal people because that is also part of my heritage but i could reach beyond that and transcend that to reach out and find ways of b
't reflect the law? secretary hagel? >> the fy15 budget we'll present earl next year will reflect the reality of whatever the situation is. i don't know if between now and next february if they worked hair on it, both parties, president has. >> that's why we're surprised when it didn't reflect this time around, but happy to hear it reflects the law of the land next time around. you know, last month, the addition of 15 additional intercepters will be deployed to alaska as reaction to the provocations we've had from north korea. this brings the numbers of alaska to the number of originally planned during the bush administration, i believe, later we deuced by president obama. i have a question to you about this. was the russian government consulted or informed that the united states was considering this decision before the decision was made, and if so, when did that occur? >> the answer is not to my knowledge. it was not russian government who was not consulted in any way, and it was not that decision, that policy was not decided based on any consideration of the russian government. incidentally
will be placed on the record for those who stood up for sensible gun safety laws in america. i think jo put it well. the parents who have come here and the family members -- i think joe put it well. the parent to have come here in the family members, we need to find a political courage with the disappointment in this vote today. this is not the end. there is more that we can do and will do. reaching out to convince members who voted the other way today and perhaps in the next election to challenge them. bring the issue forward to the american people. this is worth the fight. we have got to stand up to bring sensible gun safety to america. god forbid what tomorrow's victims will be, but we know they will be there. we have to do everything we can to spare another family from this agree. thank you. let me salute all of my andeagues, particularly joe the families who have lit a candle. that is a hard, hard thing to do when you go through what they went through. you do not want to get out of bed, let alone come here and argue truth to power, which you have done. it will not be forgotten. it will
internal administrative restriction we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is. >> we will make a request on that. and appreciate your follow-up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. i look forward to working with you and especially working with the committed women and men at the state department. i have to tell you that i have really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fellow in my office who i am looking forward to continue to work with me. as the ranking member of the africa subcommittee, i wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you'll consider. first of all u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv-aids funding through pet far. and number three, support for peacekeeping operation. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping isce in mali, and there al
and decisions, which obviously affect complying with the law of the land if we have to. >> if i may follow-up, do you have an intention for a timetable for when the department would get back to the committee on it intension and plan for complying? >> i have to look at the review the deputy secretary of defense, chairman of the joint chiefs are leading and preceded on that basis. i don't want an expectation that isn't correct. that's why want to make sure i understand what is expected. as to your questions about overseas and other adamant however and the observation about assessing what you have to do to comply with these new realities. yes his affairs. we have been consolidating and closing facilities overseas the last few years. we'll have a study complete at the end of this year, specific way on additional recommendations of consolidating overseas. should be i agree. i think the leadership, dod donate to the terror infrastructure in this country as well. >> can i just had a couple of facts? there's about 30 more scheduled over the next 30 years in addition to the consolidation. we've bee
of the sequester and it's important to emphasize it is not a one-year proposition is writt into law to continue. given a list of fat and the woulit be fair to say then, riouses security risk basedt right now? >> it certainly is consuming a company intelligence community leadership for what we see happening to the capability and importantly the expectations people seem to have for our having this global insight and that is going to be very hard. if we sustain sequestration through 2021, what the law calls for, as i said in my testimony to the senate in telogen's community and a day before, we collectively have to rethink what people expect from the intelligence community because it isn't going to be the same. >> general flynn. >> i just want to emphasize is a senior leader, just to reemphasize the general clapper talked about, we are about people and we do not want to damage that vital component of our capability. the sequestration provides is no flexibility. not just this year, but over the long haul. our adversaries won't take a strategic pause and the real cost director clapper highlightedvwe
our civilian system of justice under u.s. law the united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions the. >> bill: well some constitutional experts dispute mr. cancery's statement if you partner up with a foreign terrorist organization you become part of that. it's about interrogation not about trial "wall street journal" has by far the most section tonight left one bomber dead, one police officer dead and other bomber gravely wounded. joining us from boston brian bender "boston globe" reporter and craner. let's pick it up ms. cram kramer with the two suspects in cambridge around 10:00 p.m. thursday night. take it from there. >> yes. that's when the chaos essentially began. what happened was they come upon officer sean collier, for reasons we do not understand yet and may never understand they open fire on him. the word that has been used for that was an assassination by police. police have called it an assassination. from there, they move to hijack a vehicle from a man who was driving a mercedes bins. they take the vehicle and drive it into water town. they release the m
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
metropolitan area. only law enforcement, of course, is able to take to the skies in that area. we have what can only be described as an extraordinary situation in a major american city this morning. i want to turn to don berelli, a form fer special agent with the fbi, part of the joint terrorism task force, and has expertise and a security consultant. so much to talk to you about but i think you can't fathom a more dangerous situation for the officers who are responding here. >> absolutely. that was my first thought. it does not get much worse than this. you have somebody who has both weapons and explosives, and it appears they may have this person contained. appears, we don't know that for sure. but the concern, obviously, is could he be in a barricade situation, which is an extremely dangerous position for tactical officers and worse than that, could he take hostages and that's where the danger goes through the roof. this is the concern immediately as far as tactically what is happening on the ground there. then you have the added angle of possible accomplices. what's happening around the cit
found two unexploded bombs. this morning a senior law enforcement official says there were no unexploded devices, just the two that went off. several officials say the bombs that went off included shrapnels to multiply the injuries, bebes and ball bearings. investigators are investigating video to see if they can see individuals placing the packages. there is a video from the back carrying two backpacks but it's too soon to know whether that had anything to do with the attack. authorities say there is no suspect in custody but they did talk last night to a 20-year-old saudi man here on a currently active student visa. he had burns and questioned for hours and it's his home that was searched in the boston suburb of revere. they carried away some materials for examination but one official said it's too certain to know one or the other about him, that he might have been an innocent bystander. >> let's get to michael lighter, nbc news terrorism expert. good morning to you. the key question everyone is waking up with is what is your gut? does this bear the hallmarks of some domestic terrorism
and every law enforcement authority tries to sort through the information here in boston today, martha. >> bill, details have been coming in fast an furious this morning. let's go over what we know right now. there is a massive manhunt currently underway for one. suspects, 19-year-old dzhokhar tsnaraev who is believed to be a terrorist. believed to be heavily armed and dangerous at this hour as police are in pursuit of this, of this known to be terrorist all public schools, including m.i.t., emerson and harvard, shut down this morning. they're telling everybody stay right where you are. all the transportation is shut down and residents in surrounding area are advised to stay in their homes as well. gretchen carlson has been covering this throughout the course of the morning and she is with us now. gretchen. >> good morning to you, martha. i'm looking at ap wire right now. they have been in touch with the father of the suspects in russia this morning. he described his 26-year-old son tamerlan who had been killed, somebody who is smart. his younger one who is on the run, dzhokar, a secon
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
that we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is spent we will make a request on that and appreciate your follow up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chair. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment, and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. >> thank you. >> i look forward to working with you, and especially working with the committed men and women at the state department. i have to tell you that i've really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fell in my office who i am looking forward to continuing to work with me. as the ranking member of the african subcommittee all wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you will consider. first of all come u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv/aids funding through pepfar. number three, support for peacekeeping operations. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping force and mali and there's a
appropriate law enforcement resources to protect our citizens and investigate and to respond to this attack. obviously our first thoughts this morning are with the victims. their families and the city of boston. explosionst two gravely wounded dozens of americans and took the lives of others, including a 8-year-old boy. this was a heinous and cowardly act and given what we now know about what took place, the f.b.i.'s investigating it as an act of terrorism. any time bombs are used to target innocent civilians, it is an act of terror. what we don't yet know, however, is who carried out this attack or why, whether it was planned and executed by a terrorist organization, foreign or domestic, or was the act of a malevolent individual. that's what we don't yet know. and clearly we're at the beginning of our investigation. it will take time to follow every lead and determine what happened. but we will find out. we will find whoever harmed our citizens and we will bring them to justice. we also know this, the american people refuse to be terrorized. because what the world saw yesterday, in the aft
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
law enforcement all appealing to the public, asking for any amateur video and photographic evidence that can aid in what now has become a massive investigation. >> we are in the process of securing and processing the most complex crime scene that we've dealt with in the history of our department. we are doing that under the direction of the fbi and in partnership with the atf. jenna: not insignificant that he says that the most complex investigation in their department's history. despite a variety of different reports that you've all heard over the last 24, nearly 24 hours, the commissioner is making it very clear that right now no one is in custody in connection with these attacks. >> we still do not know who did this or why, and people shouldn't skwrupl top conclusions before -- jump to conclusions before we have all the facts you about. make no mistake, we will get to the bottom of this. and we will find out who did this. we'll find out why they did this. any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice. jon: president obama on the air just
with updates on the victims. a federal law enforcement source tells fox news that investigators have ruled out that saudi person of interest they were questioning and about whom we have been speaking. he is not a suspect. but boston's chief fbi agent promise, and i quote, we will good to the ends of the worth to find out who was behind the attack on patriots day. >> this remains an active investigation. our ongoing investigation in various locations goes on. however, there are no known additional threats. we continue to interview various witnesses and process the crime scene. which could take some time. >> shepard: here are the latest numbers. three people killed, more than 170 others wounded. we learned that eight-year-old martin richard who was watching his dad run the marathon is one of those killed. a relative saying 29-year-old crystal campbell also died. she was set to take photographs of her friend's boyfriend crossing the finish line. and now we're getting a new look at the size and power of this attack. one runner captured part of her marathon on video, including her race to the finis
from a boston law enforcement source who says in addition to the pressure cooker, they say it's undeniable, they have a twisted top of a pressure cooker, about 6 liter capacity. they believe it's two identical devices or two similar devices, but i'm also told a partial circuit board recovered in the same area that also has been sent to quantico. and now this all goes off, we go through this after airplane crashes, they try to take every piece they can get, assemble it back together, try to recreate the bomb. they're hoping to find fingerprints, any kind of dna, something from the backpack. and if you can't get personal identification items like that, look for serial numbers, brand names, at least try to figure out where was the pressure cooker, where might the bag have been bought. >> are you getting a sense from your sources about where this investigation? they are still appealing for help in terms of getting more pictures out there. giving out a fair amount of information which is sometimes kind of rare. >> you can tell from the special agent in charge at the news conference
as new york city's mayor during the 2001 world trade center terrorist attacks, a partner at the law firm. good to have you with us. >> best to be with you. lou: first, let's start with the fact that there ruled out the young man who apparently was the person of interest, not a suspect saying that he had nothing to do with it. what does that suggest to you about where they are? >> it is a setback. in the murder investigation, terrorism investigation, the logger it takes to solve the less of a chance you have to solve it. it's just a progression, a formula that is there. so they spend focusing on one person. seems to me they're now back at ground zero try to figure out how to put this all together. so when i heard them ask earlier today for everybody to cooperate photographs, i was hoping that that was a ploy and they already had a photograph from their own surveillance. apparently it out. lou: in nearly every city, obviously more familiar with new york city and boston, closed-circuit television almost everywhere. these cameras. how much surveillance to you expect there is? i have been, fr
recovered from the scene can help provide. the f.b.i. and other law enforcement is very, very good at this kind of after-incident investigation. they have the product, apparently this bomb was apparently in. they have serial numbers and trace it manufactured it and who sold it and who bought it. that backpack could lead them to the suspect or suspects. they opened a block and shrinking the crime scene which allowed our cameraman to get closer to scene and get a closer look to the crime scene technicians who are there now still tonight working to document every inch of that area and collect every shred of that evidence. that will be sent to quantico, virginia and continued search for clues. >> greta: we're posting those pictures on gretawire.com. of course, the investigators are looking at the actual construction of the bombs trying to dissect the bomb to track down the killer. f.b.i. just a short time ago confirming that they used pressure cooker explosives. eileen sullivan will be joining us. as far as we know, arlene. tell me are the bombs the same? were they aeye dent cal? >> ri
or law enforcement believed the suspect could have fled. the investigation has continued to develop. we can't give you all of the reasons, all those developments right now. we will in the fullness of time. we can't right now. but, based on those developments, we feel it is prudent to be able to say to people "you can get back out as long as you are vigilant." >> did he he get away or do you know where he is? >> who is helping you? just the state police or additional municipalities? >> this has been an ongoing effort of the joint terrorism task force. it was from its onset and it will continue to be that. so you have the fbi, the state police, and all of the local police departments, clawgd the boston police department. [several talking at the same time] >> do you believe the suspect is still in the boston area or has he fled? >> i think i would be -- no, i don't have any direct knowledge that he is here in the boston area but we don't think he would get much further. his ties seem to be here. >> brian right here. >> how and when did you know that they were being islamic suspects? >> wel
significantly more complex. american law enforcement officials currently track terror networks by tapping into chatter, monitoring videos and reports of field agents, but even if the fbi is tipped off to potential american terrorists, there's are limits to what can be done. "the new york times" reports that after the tib questioned tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, officials had quote no authority to watch him because they found no terrorism activity at the time. this scenario that an american could and would do this while flying under the radar raises serious questions regarding national security. the "washington post" writes the boston attacks might serve as a new model for terrorism in the 21st century. seeing how two kids with backpack bombs seem to have succeeded in putting a major u.s. city on lockdown, it may now dawn on al qaeda leaders that a series of small-scale attacks like this conversation the same impact as one spectacular mass casualty attack. through a combination of skill and luck, we've done well at preventing the next 9/11. preventing the next boston massacre might not be as
of border enforcement as part of its broader anti-crime law enforcement. those efforts were part of that democratic thinking and action at the time. they took up the issue of border enforcement in a role that has become a tint to it -- a continuous stream since research. intoudgets that went building the border and building the southwest border capability started in 1994. those budgets, i think when you look back at the record, the official start. taking border enforcement seriously. and putting a border effort into place that has become, since, a bipartisan support it issue. the question of putting them into the border has been a continuous stream since 1994. requests and appropriations, when republicans and democrats led the white house and both republicans and democrats led either in the senate or house overall. this is an unbroken chain and continues to go. we see it in day to day. we will see when a bill is announced tomorrow or whenever, having continuing emphasis on border security and on spending on border security. with the initial budget, we worked on the border in ways
. >> i would like to recognize the postal and law enforcement officials for their excellent work in detecting and preventing this threat before it even reached the capitol. they proved the proactive measures we put in place do in fact work. >> reporter: and this fbi operations bulletin we have excuse i havely obtained that all exposed individuals are asymptomic which means they're not sick. that is good news because ricin poison can be deadly and there is no antidote for it. jon? jon: any idea who sent the letter? >> reporter: this bulletin says the fbi is following up on multiple leads about potential senders but their investigation continues. last night we herd democratic senator claire mccaskill from missouri say, her understanding was that investigators were zeroing in on someone who is known to send in the past lawmakers a lot of letters. sources have told us that authorities have a general idea where this person might be. we don't know their identity. we know now two letters, jon, one sent to senator wicker, one sent to president obama. now we're awaiting a final tests from
of the establishment. look at aljer hiss. he was a supreme court court. his brother was a law partner. how could he be a communist spy? yet, he was. terrorists can learn that lesson. the best way to avoid scrutiny is to look like you fit in. >> we just had anna chatman, remember her, the sexy russian spy who is moscow and putin gave her an award. you raise a point about letting him back into the country, not just the first time but last year when he came back from russia. has there been an unfortunate pattern of that? egypt didn't want theli sheikh. he's convicted of being the leader of the cell that went to attack the world trade center in 1993 and plot the bombing of landmarks. he's a notorious convicted international terrorist. where is the gap? where are the holes? have we made mistakes? >> i think there are a lot of holes in our immigration system. look. i speak as someone who favors more legal immigration, but i can tell you. when i was at the justice department in the 1980s, fbi agents came and told me there were 10,000 iranian graduate students in the country and they weren't studying engli
thank all of our law enforcement personnel for doing yeoman's work. and after the pictures were flashed, obviously they were in the area and things started heating up, really, really intensely and right now they seem to have focused on watertown about ten to 12 miles outside of boston and everybody seems to be doing their jobs on high, high alert and obviously the best thing that people can do is listen to the people that know better than we do. >> now the uncle of these two terrorists has been talking and he says both of them have been here for roughly ten years, arriving 2002, 2003. in other words, they've been here a long time. and they've been through america's educational system. what do you make of that, senator? >> well, you have to wonder whether they're actually being influenced by, for example, as you know, there's inspire magazine, an of-- and put that together and how to make a pressure cooker bomb. whether they're domestic or home grown, or having influence from chechnya. it's hard to say. i'm sure we're going to hear a lot more as things develop, but it is deeply disturbin
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
of things going for new law enforcement, do you usually get your man rather quickly? >> it depends what your man has done. and what his network is. so let's talk about things that will make that more likely than less likely. if these guys, you know, have a community, if they are from the united states, if they are in college and there's fellow students who know them. if they are from boston and people right there recognize them this could wrap up tonight. on the other hand f these guys came in from another country, simple as down from canada, or across from europe, if their social network isn't here f they left two days ago. >> rose: right. >> that makes it harder. it's its difference between a shazad case a times square truck bomber who is caught within 72 hours, say, and an eric robert rudolph case, the olympic bomber who it took years to find, even after we knew exactly who he was and what he looked like. >> rose: but he was in mainly a rural area. >> he was hiding in a national forest, and you know, they scanned that-- they scanned that with night vision, motion detector. i mean a lot of
the country continues to supplement the growing and oppressive military capability by bolstering maritime law enforcement to support the claims south and east china sea. russia continue to resist putting more international pressure on syria or iran and display create sensitivity to missile defense. closer to home despite positive trends latin america weak ends to slow recovery from devastating natural disasters and drug-related violence and trafficking. in venezuela the presidential election occurred four days ago. officially announced result indicated candidate nicholas won in a narrow victory. so in some given the magnitude and complexity of our global responsibilities and comprehensive intelligence, in my mind, has never, more important or ursubsequent. i have trouble reconciling this of sequestration. with that i thank you for your attention and now turn to general flynn for his statement. >> thank you. good morning chairman, distinguish member of the committee. thank you for the opportunity to testify for your continued support to the dedicated intelligence professionals of the defense i
tobacco from 18 to 21. the new law would not prohibit people under 21 from possessing or smoking cigarettes. if passed, the measure would be the strictest limit on tobacco of any u.s. city. awesome. >> you kind of wonder when the mayor is going to pass a law that is going to require each new yorker to read at least 30 minutes of poetry. >> no. this is good. >> that one i would not expect to happen. >> this is what we need. we actually don't even need anybody buying or smoking cigarettes and getting sick from it and getting other people sick too. >> mika, can i point something out? >> sure. >> the matrix awards yesterday. women in communications. mike barnicle's wife introduced by mika brzezinski. >> oh, look at her. mika did a great job. and you know, ann did pretty damn well herself. >> ann was amazing. there's martha stewart. there were impressive women there. but i had the great honor of -- this is funny. i had the great honor of introducing ann. and they asked at one point for last year's matrix winners to stand up and barnicle stood up. >> i was wondering when mike barnicle
're looking at is f.b.i. officers who are taking the shrapnel. there's apparently over 1,000 law enforcement officials in the area now combined, which is obviously a huge number. now, we were talking about the bomb there. abc had a report about these kind of i.e.d.'s. we've seen these all over the world. let's take a look here. cenk: that's white smoke the damaging shrapnel tells of an improvised explosive device. we've seen what they do to armored vehicles, tanks and foot patrols in afghanistan. the smaller bombs as in boston are not strong enough to damage structures, but can be deadly to anyone in the kill zone. you can see and hear those dangerous projectiles exploding into the area. the actual blast of the bomb was not strong, mostly causing injury from low flying debris, leading authorities to call it a small, mobile i.e.d. cenk: that's really interesting. i'm here with my panel ben hank kits, mark thompson and michael hastings. does that say anything one way or the other? >> for sure. the numbers in afghanistan 10,000i.e.d.'s a year. i was in a vehicle that got hit by an i.e.d. it did
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